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Richmond Volume Dealer Charges

One of the most serious drug penalties you can face in Richmond or elsewhere in Virginia, is that of a ‘volume dealer’. Volume dealer charges are treated much more seriously than possession or even intent to distribute charges due to the amount of drugs involved, and therefore carry size-able penalties that can end up impacting your entire life. For this reason, if you are accused of being a volume dealer, or charged with a related offense, it is important you consult with a Richmond drug lawyer as soon as possible to discuss your case.

Legal Definition of a Volume Dealer

A volume dealer is someone that deals or traffics a significant amount of drugs. The charges are not just simple distribution but someone that is seen as trafficking any large amount of drugs throughout the city or throughout the region.

These charges typically come with significant penalties, usually minimum mandatory penalties that starts at 5 years to life in prison. These charges also usually involve multiple agencies including federal law enforcement like the FBI and DEA.

How Common Are Volume Dealer Charges?

Volume dealer charges are not that common in the City of Richmond. Most of the dealer-related charges or distribution-related charges in the city of Richmond take place on a much smaller scale. However every so often, there are arrests on high volume dealers which then carry very severe penalties.

Enforcement of Volume Dealer Charges

Volume dealers are a top priority for law enforcement not only just because of the impact it can have on a drug trade in the area but also the publicity they can get from such high volume arrest. Due to the amount of drugs that are typically involved these charges are taken very seriously by all parties involved.

High volume dealer cases are typically investigated in the City of Richmond usually through confidential informants and undercover officers used to conduct the buys.  They will also use video and audio surveillance to assist in these cases which can then be used as evidence at trial.

How Does This Compare To Other Drug Charges?

It is much more severe than other sorts of drug cases. The penalties are higher but they’re also pursued much more vigorously. In high volume cases, prosecutors are unlikely to negotiate and will seek a conviction and want an active incarceration sentence.

Continuing Criminal Enterprise

A continuing criminal enterprise is the conspiracy or the committing of a felony and drug violation or a federal drug violation. A continuing criminal enterprise usually involves five or more individuals actively conspiring together to sell and distribute drugs throughout the city, region, state.

Is This Similar To Drug Conspiracy Cases?

These cases are different than drug conspiracy cases, in that a continuing criminal enterprise requires the state to show that five or more individuals were involved. It also requires the state to show that the offender from such a charge was either an organizer or a supervisor of a continuing enterprise.

In addition, the State mush show the defendant obtained a substantial income or resources from violations or the drug violations involved. A conspiracy drug charges simply requires the state to show two or more individuals acted in concert.

Penalties For Drug Conspiracy Cases

The continuing criminal enterprise charges carry a 20-year minimum mandatory sentence if it’s a violation of the federal statute. The sentences are often much more long-term.

Importance of An Attorney

In a cases involving volume distribution cases or a continuing criminal enterprise case, you have to have experienced legal counsel.  The possible penalties are so severe that without an attorney, you will almost certainly serve a long-term active jail sentence. You need an attorney that can  aggressively challenge the witnesses against you, that can challenged how evidence was  obtained, and present a solid defense that questions all of the prosecution’s evidence.

You also need someone that can negotiate on your behalf to try and mitigate the damage and obviously, provide some sort of alternative sentencing or reduced sentencing if possible.